The Art of Becoming

January 22nd, 2020

A concept that appears difficult for students to comprehend is “becoming.”  If you think in terms of my last few blogs, a space once assigned a symbol must become that which is represented by the symbol.  Assignment is usually treated as language but you can see that its scope is much larger.  Language is a name (word, sounds, character or vibration) that marks a symbol.  With language we create the concept of time and the symbols with all potential become a pattern over time (think sundial).  To become is an act of creation or the energy of creation but to discover may just be luck or logical steps which derive from the process played out as life.  I believe that the creative act of dividing the scope of creation by a grid creates logic and in turn language.  Life is a system detailed by humans as stories and creation is an experience without language or logic.  Such a fun puzzle. 

Perhaps too many details above but a larger view is sometimes helpful.  There are two different systems from our view as functioning from within the second system but the first system created both.  Language, logic and form are expressions of our system related in human drama, relationships, plans, concepts and stories.  Living within this subsystem, none of our cognitive skills, except perhaps poetry and art, allow us to examine or discuss the primary system of creation.  Take my example above of a sundial and notice that the shadow from the marker will appear to change by a distance assigned as one hour between 5 and 6 PM.  But any sundial created will have the potential to mark all daylight time when the sun is visible.  The sundial therefore does not change but our view of it is limited by our concept of time.  At 6 PM the sundial becomes “the 6 o’clock time reference.”  Yes, the Earth spins but the sundial never changes.  Because of our human limitation a person would need to observe the sundial for the entire light of day to view its potential.  To realize this potential the sundial must maintain a relationship with both the spin of the Earth and the presence of the Sun.  We need a lifetime to reveal our potential and relationships to secure it.

If you are reading this blog you are very likely more interested in change than philosophy.  Innovation (imagination, creation) could turn the pole in the sundial vision to a lamp post, a maypole, fence post or a surveyor’s stake.  Any change would require a similar change in relationship to support it.  A human can generate a change in vision but doesn’t have the range to implement all the changes needed to secure the process.  In theory, just the change in vision should be enough if we were operating from the primary system of creation.  From our subsystem, we just change the story.  We have all heard the rare tales of someone that pulled such an alteration off and secured it.  My guess is they commandeered energy support from a large group of folks.  They may not have known them but the vision change collected them.  I have learned to monitor the pattern (the change in the shadow) and see it as art.  I “see” the pattern and “paint” in areas to comply with what is needed to realize the change.  I make an assignment to an empty space (any space) and request a sample of what the pattern should look like to monitor the change.  If I can stay conscious with the process, only a little “painting” is needed to focus the required vision.  In truth, it is more like feeling the pattern and adjusting by a felt nudge here and there.  With the pattern developing in an appropriate manner, the rest is just becoming the new vision.  No tasks to do but trust and a feeling of some level of certainty help keep the energy flow high.  In other words, enthusiasm and excitement support energy flow whereas depression and feelings of failure impede it.  This process of “becoming” always unfolds in a trail of clues so you need to pay attention and be aware.  Not a logical process, not normal, not predictable and very easy to over-think or overreact.  Not something new to learn but something old to remember.    

Chriss

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