Value of Symbols

February 1st, 2024

Before we developed language, we made-up stories as a report on what we, in our minds, thought happened and scratched those reflections as images onto cave walls—sacred space today reflecting fabricated stories about possible real events.  Do you understand, we are still processing life with the same protocols?  Yes, the good news, we have larger and more confident groups.  We know that there are lots of languages but very few written.  A few of us humans converted markings on walls into written language but the stories still reflect our bravado along with facts about the event.  We are storytellers and not factual reporters.

I believe that we inheritably inflate our part in any experience to overcome the unconscious patterns designed and installed in all of us for our protection (unconscious lessons by family and culture).  We define in stories how we overcame the risk to our life to accomplish our goal and seek acknowledgement from our peers for the effort.  A move from cave walls to Facebook with little alteration in the requirement for tribute.

When we witness a phenomenon, any imaginable perception, we record it as a symbol—an image that we link to the actual phenomena.  When we developed language, we attempted to apply logical structure (mapping for space as location) and that breaks the connection to the phenomena; a non-logical perception.  This assimilation of thought to logical things is useful in practical human life.  We Earth creatures define self as a logical object in space.  We necessarily express ourselves by means of words and we usually think in terms of space or location.  But the unknown, by definition, is not a logical reference nor does it exist in any defined space.  Language requires us to establish between our ideas the same sharp and precise distinctions, the same discontinuity, as between material objects.  This is not possible.  A novel creation is not a logical recalled experience.  Getting lost in the attempt to map via logic may generate sufficient disconnect from the inspiring potential.  

Over the centuries, we have attempted to revert to those old symbols; that effort traditionally presents itself as totally ideological.  Very fun experience for a meditation but will not pay the rent.  Phenomena does not occupy space.  If we attempt to rid ourselves of those old clumsy links to symbols, we find ourselves lost in a space with no future—always unknown and phenomenon by definition.  The game of processing quality to find quality introduces contradiction into the very heart of the process.  The logical conclusion to redundancy is annihilation. 

We have created an undefined “space” for potential.  Materializing symbols are clues from that potential and we need to attend to those clues for sufficient time (a special partition of space) to become a demonstration in logical form to represent, with limitation, that potential.  We have a game.         

Chriss

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